Emerging markets

India’s Forex Reserves : Foreign Exchange Reserves update of India for last 2 weekends 16th and 23rd May 2014

Image Posted on

 

Foreign Exchange Reserves of India update
Foreign Exchange Reserves of India update
Foreign Exchange Reserves of India update
Foreign Exchange Reserves of India update

 

 

#India’s #ForexReserves : #ForeignExchangeReserves for last 2 weekends 16th and 23rd May 2014.

India’s Foreign Exchange Reserves at US Dollar 312.6 Billion plus compared to US Dollar 314.9 Billion as on 23rd May 2014 week on week.

#IndiaForeignExchange reserves consist of 91.33% #ForeignCurrencyAssets , 6.71% #GoldReserves, 1.42% #SDRs and 0.54% #IMFReserve.

Latest Data Released by India’s Central Bank #RBI #ReserveBankofIndia on 23rd May 2014.

1 or One Billion United States Dollar is currently around 5900 Crores in Indian Rupee terms currently

#IndiaForeignExchangeReserves #IndiaForexReserves

Foreign Exchange Reserves of India update

Image Posted on Updated on

Foreign Exchange Reserves of India update
Foreign Exchange Reserves of India update
Foreign Exchange Reserves of India update Infographic
Foreign Exchange Reserves of India update Infographic
Foreign Exchange Reserves of India update Infographic
Foreign Exchange Reserves of India update Infographic

 

India’s Forex Reserves : Forex Reserves with breakup of each component Foreign Currency Assets, Gold Reserves, SDRs IMF Reserve Positions and their % share in total Forex Reserves..

India’s Foreign Exchange Reserves at US Dollar 311.85 billion plus as on 2nd May 2014 with week on week comparison. India’s Foreign Exchange reserves consist of 91.25% Foreign Currency Assets , 6.72% Gold Reserves, 1.44% SDRs and 0.59% IMF Reserve.

India’s Foreign Exchange Reserves at US Dollar 309.91 billion plus as on 25th April 2014 with week on week comparison. India’s Foreign Exchange reserves consist of 91% Foreign Currency Assets , 6.96% Gold Reserves 1.45% SDRs and 0.59% IMF Reserve.

India’s Foreign Exchange Reserves at US Dollar 309.41 billion plus as on 18th April 2014 with week on week comparison. India’s Foreign Exchange reserves consist of 90.99% Foreign Currency Assets , 6.97% Gold Reserves, 1.45% SDRs and 0.59% IMF Reserve.

Latest Data Released by India’s Central Bank #RBI #ReserveBankofIndia on 9th May 2014

1 or One Billion United States Dollar is currently around 6100 Crores in Indian Rupee terms currently

#IndiaForeignExchangeReserves #ForexReserves

Foreign Exchange Reserves of India update

Image Posted on Updated on

Foreign Exchange Reserves of India update
Foreign Exchange Reserves of India update

 

Foreign Exchange Reserves of India update
Foreign Exchange Reserves of India update

 

India’s Forex Reserves : Forex Reserves with breakup of each component Foreign Currency Assets,  Gold Reserves, SDRs IMF Reserve Positions and their % share in total Forex Reserves..

India’s Foreign Exchange Reserves at US Dollar 309.41 billion plus as on 18th April 2014 with week on week comparison. India’s Foreign Exchange reserves consist of 90.99% Foreign Currency Assets , 6.97% Gold Reserves, 1.45% SDRs and 0.59% IMF Reserve.

India’s Foreign Exchange Reserves at US Dollar 309.91 billion plus as on 25th April 2014 with week on week comparison. India’s Foreign Exchange reserves consist of 91% Foreign Currency Assets , 6.96% Gold Reserves 1.45%  SDRs and 0.59% IMF Reserve.

Latest Data Released by India’s Central Bank #RBI #ReserveBankofIndia on 2nd May 2014

1 or One Billion United States Dollar is currently around 6100 Crores in Indian Rupee terms currently

#IndiaForeignExchangeReserves #ForexReserves

 

Monetary Policy Week in Review for last week – Central Bank News

Posted on Updated on

Monetary Policy Week in Review – Mar 30, 2013: Chance of global crises eases as 3 banks cut rates, 8 hold, 1 raises – Central Bank News.

Last week 12 central banks took policy decisions with three banks cutting rates (Vietnam,Hungary and Georgia), eight keeping rates on hold (Israel, AngolaTurkeyMoroccoTaiwan,ZambiaCzech Republic and Romania) and Tunisia becoming the fifth central bank to raise rates this year.
    The main message gleaned from central banks last week was that the global economy continues to recover, but every time it seems to pick up a little steam, confidence is undermined by developments in Europe, the only major risk to a sustained recovery. 
    But like a resilient boxer, the global economy dusts itself off and gets back on its feet, adjusting to the fact that large bank depositors in Europe may have to share the costs of future bank bailouts with tax payers, the main lesson from Cyprus.
    After the shock from this major but ultimately positive policy shift, there was a sense of relief that Europe had muddled through, once again, and financial markets had taken the events in stride.
     “It appears that there has been a decline in the probability of a crises occurring, a development which has reduced the high level of uncertainty that prevailed in the last year,” the Bank of Israel said in its statement.
    But as both Israel and the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) acknowledged, the global economic picture remains mixed and “it is too early to say whether the improved market sentiment over the past six months is the beginning of a sustained recovery, or merely a temporary upswing.”
    The challenges facing Europe’s policy makers is considerable. Not only do they have to restore financial health to governments and banks, they must also find ways to strengthen economic growth at a time of growing challenges from emerging markets.
    “The renewed market tension associated with the handling of the sovereign and banking crisis in Cyprus in recent weeks has provided a reminder of the political, economic and social challenges of resolving the pervasive fiscal and banking sector problems,” the RBA said in its financial review.
     In the latest manifestation of the structural shift in the global economy – illustrated by a stagnating Europe and growing emerging markets – the leaders of Brazil, Russia, India, and South Africa and China agreed to establish a New Development Bank.
    The leaders of these five countries, known as the BRICS countries, acknowledged that their infrastructure has to be improved but currently there is insufficient long-term and foreign investment in capital stock.
    Acknowledging their role and responsibility for global governance, the BRICS leaders said a bank, which now will be established, would use global financial resources more productively and thus make a positive contribution in boosting global demand.
    They also agreed to establish a $100 billion financial reserve arrangement that would “help BRICS countries forestall short-term liquidity pressures, provide mutual support and further strengthen financial stability,” the leaders said in their March 27 Durban declaration.
     The Contingent Reserve Arrangement (CRA) would help strengthen the global financial safety net during times of market turmoil.
         
    Through the first 13 weeks of the year, 77 percent of the 125 policy decisions taken by the 90 central banks followed by Central Bank News lead to unchanged rates, marginally down from 78 percent after the first 11 weeks.
    Globally, 19 percent of policy decisions this year have lead to rate cuts, largely by central banks in emerging economies, a ratio that was steady from last week.
    Of the 24 rate cuts worldwide so far this year, 42 percent have come from central banks in emerging markets and the remainder from frontier markets and other countries.
    No central banks in developed markets have cut rates this year, but this is largely because many of those central banks slashed rates to effectively zero five years ago and then switched to various forms of so-called quantitative easing to stimulate demand.
LAST WEEK’S (WEEK 13) MONETARY POLICY DECISIONS:
COUNTRY MSCI     NEW RATE           OLD RATE        1 YEAR AGO
ISRAEL DM 1.75% 1.75% 2.50%
VIETNAM FM 8.00% 9.00% 14.00%
ANGOLA 10.00% 10.00% 10.25%
TURKEY EM 5.50% 5.50% 5.75%
MOROCCO EM 3.00% 3.00% 3.00%
HUNGARY EM 5.00% 5.25% 7.00%
GEORGIA 4.50% 4.75% 6.50%
TAIWAN EM 1.88% 1.88% 1.88%
ZAMBIA 9.25% 9.25% 9.00%
CZECH REPUBLIC EM 0.05% 0.05% 0.75%
TUNISIA FM 4.00% 3.75% 3.50%
ROMANIA FM 5.25% 5.25% 5.25%
Next week (week 14) features six central bank policy decisions, including Australia, Thailand, Uganda, Japan, United Kingdom and the euro area.
COUNTRY MSCI          MEETING               RATE        1 YEAR AGO
AUSTRALIA DM 2-Apr 3.00% 4.25%
THAILAND EM 3-Apr 2.75% 3.00%
UGANDA 3-Apr 12.00% 21.00%
JAPAN DM 4-Apr 0.10% 0.10%
UNITED KINGDOM DM 4-Apr 0.50% 0.50%
EURO AREA DM 4-Apr 0.75% 1.00%

 

Global Monetary Policy Rates – February 2013 : Global Central Bank News

Posted on Updated on

Global Monetary Policy Rates – Feb. 2013: Rates decline further but pace slows as growth prospects improve – Central Bank News.

 Global interest rates declined further in February as six central banks cut rates by a total of 150 basis points, pushing the average global monetary policy rate down to 5.86 percent from January’s 5.88 percent and December’s 5.92 percent.
    The pace of rate cuts cooled from January when the 90 central banks followed by Central Bank News trimmed rates by a total of 342 basis points, as many central banks start to shift towards a more neutral stance to gauge the impact of last year’s rate cuts, U.S. budget cuts and Europe’s recession.
    Only one central bank raised rates in February: Serbia, which has now raised rates by 50 basis points this year, continuing its dogged fight against inflation.
    Apart from Denmark, which raised its rate in January for exchange rate reasons, Serbia is the only central bank worldwide to have tightened policy this year, illustrating how weak global demand is keeping inflation at bay and allowing central banks to cut interest rates to stimulate growth.
    Declining inflation rates and subdued upward pressure was specifically cited by five of this month’s rate cutters (Georgia, Azerbaijan, Poland, Hungary and Colombia) in their policy statements. 
    Nevertheless, some central banks are starting to voice concern over inflationary pressures, especially Brazil, Russia and Malaysia, while China has been draining funds from the banking system to temper the rise in inflation.
    While there are still major risks to the global economic recovery, the overall picture of the global economy is one of brightening prospects, with the U.S., China and emerging markets growing stronger while Europe is weakening.
    The Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) and the Bank of Israel (BOI) typify those central banks that are in a holding pattern. After last year’s sizable rate cuts, their economies are adjusting with the RBA saying the full impact of “significant easing” is yet to come while the BOI notes it’s too early to tell whether the economy has reached a turning point.
    Asia remains the hub for global growth, with a pickup in China’s economic activity cited by both Indonesia and far-away Chile as helping their exports. South Korea, Thailand, Japan and Sweden also noted improving exports.
     New Zealand, whose strong currency is helping curtain inflation, is also more upbeat about its economic prospects and keeping a close eye on house prices for any signs of overheating.

INTEREST RATE CUTS, YEAR-TO-DATE IN BASIS POINTS, FEBRUARY 2013:

COUNTRY MSCI    CURRENT RATE       YTD CHANGE
KENYA FM 9.50% -150
MONGOLIA 12.50% -75
COLOMBIA EM 3.75% -50
GEORGIA 4.75% -50
HUNGARY EM 5.25% -50
JAMAICA 5.75% -50
POLAND EM 3.75% -50
AZERBAIJAN 4.75% -25
ALBANIA 3.75% -25
ANGOLA 10.00% -25
INDIA EM 7.75% -25
MACEDONIA 3.50% -25
BULGARIA FM 0.01% -2



www.CentralBankNews.info

 

 

7 Enticing Facts About Investing Returns Over the Past Two Decades

Posted on Updated on

7 Enticing Facts About Investing Returns Over the Past Two Decades.

The last decade has felt like a particularly rough one for investors, so I was surprised to learn recently that the S&P 500 (SNPINDEX: ^GSPC  ) has had only one negative year over the past 10 years. That was just one of the many intriguing facts that I discovered by looking at The Callan Periodic Table of Investment Returns.

Callan’s table plots the annual returns for key indexes in rank order over the past two decades. The nine key indexes are: S&P 500; S&P 500 Value; S&P 500 Growth; MSCI Emerging Markets; MSCI EAFE; Russell 2000 (RUSSELLINDICES: ^RUT), Russell 2000 Value; Russell 2000 Growth; and the Barclays Aggregate Bond Index.

Among the surprising facts I learned are:

·         The MSCI Emerging Markets Index has led all of the other key indexes in seven of the past 10 years.

·         The Barclays Aggregate Bond Index has been at the bottom of the table in seven of the past 10 years.

·         Small caps (Russell 2000 Index) have outperformed large caps (S&P 500) in seven of the past 10 years.

Just as my pattern recognition faculties began making sense of things, I also learned, however, that:

·         The MSCI Emerging Markets Index came in dead last among all of the key indexes in five of the 10 years from 1993 to 2002. It came in last overall for seven of the last 20 years.

·         Even though the Barclays Aggregate Bond Index came in last seven of the past 10 years, it crushed the S&P 500 by over 42 percentage points in 2008.

·         And while small caps tended to outperform large caps in most years over the past decade, large caps outperformed small caps for five consecutive years from 1994 through 1998.

So what should we make of this somewhat contradictory array of market data?

Perhaps nothing at all. In fact, all of this data might serve as a perfect example of our all-too-human desire to make patterns out of random data. Resisting the urge to make investments based on our pattern-creating tendencies might just save us a lot of money over the long run.

Your most dangerous investment advisor
In his classic book “Your Money and Your Brain: How the New Science of Neuroeconomics Can Help Make You Rich, the investing writer Jason Zweig warns of the dangers of searching for patterns in random data. He writes that, “When it comes to investing, our incorrigible search for patterns leads us to assume that order exists where often it doesn’t.”

In Zweig’s book, Professor Michael Gazzaniga talks of the part of the brain known as the “interpreter,” which is constantly searching “for explanations and patterns in random or complex data.” Relying on the interpreter in investing is particularly dangerous because we may think we’ve identified a pattern that is more likely an illusion.

For example, we might look at the Callan Table and conclude that small caps will outperform large caps over the next 10 years because of their record of relative outperformance over the past 10. Or we may determine that it’s not worth diversifying our portfolios with bonds, since they’ve consistently underperformed the other indexes in most years over the past decade.

Those are just two very simple examples for illustration purposes, of course. The real takeaway from looking at the Callan table is that we shouldn’t leap to conclusions when interpreting market data. Indeed, Zweig notes that the problem with pattern recognition and the investor brain is that it’s unconscious, automatic, and uncontrollable.

We may conclude, for example, that investing in the MSCI Emerging Markets over the next decade is a can’t-miss-idea solely because the index has been on such a roll over the past decade. Such an approach would probably be very unwise, however. A much better reason to invest in emerging markets would be because your extensive research leads you to believe that those countries will perform well going forward due to their strong economic fundamentals.

For me, the Callan table really drives home the importance of both dollar-cost averaging anddiversification within your portfolio. I don’t think most investors are capable of timing the market. And I suspect the vast majority will never know which investing style or asset class will be in or out of favor at any given time. Relying on our “interpreters” to make those decisions will likely end very badly.

Don’t get burned
Zweig notes that the Ancient Scythians would burn to death any soothsayer whose predictions failed to come true. Thankfully, we don’t have to worry about such extreme consequences if we decide to predict the future based on a snapshot of historical market data. We could lose a lot of money, however, which alone should be enough to discourage us from pursuing such a dubious strategy.