Month: September 2013

India Equity Market Banking Sector Index Nse Bank Nifty performance

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India Equity Market Banking Sector Index Nse Bank Nifty performance

ndia Equity Market Banking Sector Index Nse Bank Nifty performance yearly update till 27th September 2013 with weekly , monthly , quarterly performance and Highs , Lows

Indian Stock Market Benchmark Index Nse Nifty performance update till 27th September 2013

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Indian Stock Market Benchmark Index Nse Nifty performance update till 27th September 2013

Indian Stock Market Benchmark Index Nse Nifty performance update till 27th September 2013 with weekly , monthly , quarterly and yearly returns with highs and lows

Indian Stock Market Benchmark Index Bse Sensex performance 27th September 2013

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Indian Stock Market Benchmark Index Bse Sensex performance 27th September 2013

Indian Stock Market Benchmark Index Bse Sensex performance 27th September 2013 on weekly , monthly , quarterly and yearly basis along with return on Sensex

India’s Monetary Policy Highlights Part 2 released on 20th September 2013

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j board Monetary Policy 2part 20sept13

 

India’s Monetary Policy Highlights Part 2 released by India’s Central Bank RBI Reserve Bank of India on 20th September 2013

U.S Trust in Media Recovers Slightly From All-Time Low

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More Americans say media are too liberal than too conservative

by Elizabeth Mendes
September 19, 2013

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Americans’ confidence in the accuracy of the mass media has improved slightly after falling to an all-time low last year. Now, 44% say they have a great deal or fair amount of trust and confidence in the mass media, identical to 2011 but up from 40% in 2012, the lowest reading since Gallup regularly began tracking the question in 1997.

Trend: Americans' Trust in the Mass Media

The latest results are based on Gallup’s annual Governance survey, conducted Sept. 5-8. Americans have consistently been more distrusting than trusting of the media each year since 2007, in contrast with 1997 through 2003, when the slight majority expressed trust in the media.

This year’s bump in confidence comes mainly from independents and Republicans, after these groups’ trust in the media dropped last year amid a heated presidential election race in which Mitt Romney supporters may have felt their candidate was being treated unfairly. Democrats’ confidence, however, has been inching up since 2011.

Trend: Trust in Mass Media, by Party

Americans Continue to See Media as Too Liberal

Consistent with Republicans’ and independents’ dissatisfaction with the media, far more Americans say the media are too liberal than too conservative, 46% vs. 13%, as was the case in 2011, and every year since Gallup has been tracking this trend. Thirty-seven percent currently describe the media’s political leanings as “just about right.”

Trend: Americans' Perceptions of Media Bias

Perceptions of a liberal media bias are particularly strong among Republicans and conservatives, with 74% and 73%, respectively, saying the media are too liberal. However, half of independents also call it too liberal, while most Democrats call it “just about right.”

Perceptions of Media Bias, by Party and Ideology, September 2013

Bottom Line

Although up from the all-time low found last year, Americans’ confidence in the mass media remains lower than it was in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Their confidence began to decline in 2005 and has been lower since. The decline over that period is apparent among Democrats, independents, and Republicans — although Democrats remain much more trusting of the media than do the other groups.

Democrats’ higher confidence and Republicans’ lower confidence in the media may be related to the media’s perceived liberal leanings. Regardless of whether the media do favor a liberal point of view, the plurality of Americans perceive it does. Far fewer Americans see the media as too conservative.

 

In U.S., Trust in Media Recovers Slightly From All-Time Low.

New Migrants to US Struggle to Afford the Basics

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September 18, 2013

Many migrants’ financial situations improve with time

by Neli Esipova, Julie Ray, and Anita Pugliese

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Regardless of where they come from or where they go, new migrants are more likely to struggle to afford food and shelter than the native-born in the countries they move to. Those who migrated to high-income economies (referred to as “the North”) struggle less the longer they stay, but this is not always true for migrants who move to middle- to low-income economies (referred to as “the South”).

Struggling to afford food or shelter

These findings, featured in the International Organization for Migration’s World Migration Report 2013, are based on Gallup World Poll interviews with nearly 25,000 first-generation migrants and 442,000 native-born residents in 150 countries between 2009 and 2011. The large sample enables Gallup to divide migrants into two categories — newcomers (who moved to their destination country less than five years ago) and long-timers (who have lived in their current country for at least five years) — and compare their life experiences with the native-born.

Although migrants who move from one high-income economy to another (North to North) still experience hardship in the first few years of their arrival, their ability to afford food and shelter gets better with time. North-to-North long-timers struggle to afford food (12%) and shelter (7%) about as much as the native-born (11% and 8%, respectively).

Migrants who move from middle- to low-income economies to high-income economies (South to North) do not fare nearly as well, and their situations do not improve as quickly. Newcomers struggle most to meet their basic needs and are at least twice as likely as the native-born to say they did not have enough money at times to buy the food they needed (28% for newcomers and 11% for the native-born) or adequate shelter (19% vs. 8%).

Migrants who move from one middle- to low-income economy to another (South to South), regardless of how long they have been in the country, struggle more than the native-born do to afford the basics. More than one-quarter find it difficult to afford food and shelter. With time, fewer struggle to buy food, but affording shelter remains just as much of a problem for migrants. Migrants moving from North to South have as much trouble affording food and shelter as the native-born, but newcomers are most likely to report problems with food.

Some Migrants’ Situations Are Better, Some Worse Than if They Had Stayed Home

Some migrants struggle less to afford food and shelter and some struggle more compared with what their situations would have been if they had stayed in their countries of origin. North-to-North long-timers benefited from the move; they are less likely than their counterparts back home — their matched stayers — to report problems with food and shelter. South-to-North long-timers, on the other hand, are statistically as likely to struggle as if they had not left.

Struggles to afford food and shelter migrants vs. those who stayed at home

South-to-South long-timers are significantly worse off in terms of being able to afford adequate housing: 27% of migrants struggled to afford shelter in the previous year, versus 19% of their counterparts back home. This may reflect higher housing costs in destination countries.

Bottom Line

Overall, these results show that new migrants, regardless of where they come from or where they go, are vulnerable. But they also show that migrants’ ability to afford the basics improves with time, particularly for those who move to high-income economies. In lower-income economies, buying food becomes less of a problem for migrants the longer they stay, but affordable housing remains a significant obstacle for many.

These two measures, taken together, are a good indicator of the prevalence of poverty among migrants — a measure that is not captured at the global level in any other existing surveys. These measures provide additional information to policymakers about how financial difficulties affect migrants’ day-to-day lives — at different points on their migration journey — in a way that a relative income measure alone cannot.

New Migrants Struggle to Afford the Basics.